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Moves to Negotiate

Remains of Dillon's Cross meat market, Cork, after official reprisal. © IWM (Q 107756)

Remains of Dillon's Cross meat market, Cork, after official reprisal. © IWM (Q 107756)

Following intensified violence in late 1920, British forces were demorolised by internal and external opinion of the war in Ireland.

The British public were becoming progressively disturbed by the actions of their forces, most notably reprisals on civilians, and began to put pressure on the government in Westminster to find a solution to the conflict. 


IRA suspects guarded by British soldiers at the Bandon Barracks. © IWM (Q 71708)

IRA suspects guarded by British soldiers at the Bandon Barracks. © IWM (Q 71708)

The IRA also had reasons to find a resolution to the struggle. By the summer of 1920 the group was becoming increasingly short of ammunition and weapons, and many of their fighters had been imprisoned. 

On the 11th July 1921, a truce was negotiated between British and Irish Republican forces so that discussions on a political settlement could commence.