In Summer 2019, we invited all Invictus UK Family & Friends aged 9-18 and young people from across Sheffield to write a poem, song, speech or create a piece of artwork to celebrate the Invictus UK Trials and the inspirational competitors.

Never Such Innocence gave children and young people a powerful voice on conflict and commemoration at the Invictus UK Trials whilst celebrating the achievements of competitors.


From May to July 2019 we ran a creative arts competition as part of the Invictus UK Trials, which was delivered by a partnership of Help for Heroes, the Royal British Legion, the Ministry of Defence and Sheffield City Council.

We invited all Invictus UK Family & Friends aged 9-18 and young people from across Sheffield to reflect on their family’s / their community’s experience of conflict, currently or throughout history and the sacrifices both the Armed Forces and civilians make at times of war and respond creatively through a poem, a speech, a song, or a piece of art.



We invited all Invictus UK Family & Friends aged 9-18 and young people from across Sheffield to reflect on their family’s / their community’s experience of conflict, currently or throughout history and the sacrifices both the Armed Forces and civilians make at times of war and respond creatively through a poem, a speech, a song, or a piece of art.

We invited all Invictus UK Family & Friends aged 9-18 and young people from across Sheffield reflect on their family’s / their community’s experience of conflict, currently or throughout history and the sacrifices both the Armed Forces and civilians make at times of war and respond creatively through a poem, a speech, a song, or a piece of art.

Every entrant received a very special personalised certificate of commendation and was automatically entered into our 2019/20 international competition, launching September 2019.

Free songwriting, speechwriting and poetry workshops were held from June ahead of the Trials.


The dark is PTSD, DEPRESSION ANXIETY, THE YELLOW LINE IS INVICTUS PUSHING THE DEPRESSION AWAY SO THAT THE PERSON FEELS LOVED AGAIN

The dark is PTSD, DEPRESSION ANXIETY, THE YELLOW LINE IS INVICTUS PUSHING THE DEPRESSION AWAY SO THAT THE PERSON FEELS LOVED AGAIN

During the week of the Trials, a programme of free songwriting workshops were held just for the competitors Friends & Family where the young people worked with singer songwriter Bethzienna Williams (finalist of The Voice 2019!) and created songs exploring what the Invictus UK Trials meant to them…

Winning work was showcased in Sheffield during the week of the Trials, from 22nd to 26th July, and all participants were invited to a special certificate-giving event.

During the week we invited all the Family and Friends to participate in an art activity, the example on the left was just one of many we received. Underneath the artwork the caption reads ‘The dark is PTSD, depression anxiety, the yellow line is Invictus pushing the depression away so that the person feels loved again.’

Our certificate giving event invited all Invictus UK Family & Friends aged 9-18 and young people from across Sheffield to come together, write a song and then receive their certificate from British Television Presenter and Paralympian, Ade Adepitan. There was even a very special welcome from the Lord Mayor of Sheffield, Tony Downing - who opened the whole of the Invictus UK Trials in Sheffield only two days before!

The competition received hundreds of speeches, artwork, poems and songs from young people across Sheffield and indeed from the rest of the United Kingdom. We were delighted and overwhelmed with the powerful  thought provoking and profoundly moving images and words the children produced. Truly providing a heartfelt reflection on the competitors and the trials themselves.


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Molly Meleady-Hanley reciting her poem Invictus Is Me at the opening of the Invictus UK Trials in Sheffield


We aim to provide a valuable outlet for service children and young people to celebrate the contribution their families make in keeping our world safe, whilst enabling young people to express their feelings around family member injury and absence through deployment. We are starting a project with Norton House at the DNRC, giving the children of injured servicemen or women a vehicle to express their fears and anxieties.